Bongo News

Our Miss Kate on the Big Day

»Posted on May 1, 2011 in Blog, Bongo News | 0 comments

Our Miss Kate on the Big Day

While over 60 million viewers delighted in watching the royal English wedding, we were having a bit of fun with our own Ms. Kate and her friends at the Animal Orphanage. Do you have a “Prince for Ms. Kate,” you asked. While Prince William and his beautiful bride followed their heart, but there’s no such luxury in the animal world. Not unlike in mankind’s own ancestry, “good breeding” is regulated by science concerned with “lineage.” Still, we do have a handsome young bongo in mind, But until they meet she will continue to delighting us all with her graceful beauty and exceptional good nature. To help insure her future you can donate to Ms Kate’s “trousseau” benefiting the bongo rehabilitation back to the...

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Celebrating the Royal Wedding at Mt. Kenya

»Posted on Apr 27, 2011 in Blog, Bongo News | 0 comments

Celebrating the Royal Wedding at Mt. Kenya

A little more than 6 months ago we named this little new born baby bongo “Ms Kate” at the Animal Orphanage. She has since stolen all of our hearts with her beauty and totally loving personality. The royal wedding fever has not missed the slopes of Mount Kenya, so Bea, Fundi and the keepers are organizing a “feast” for all the animals to celebrate!! No better time than this to let your imagination run wild and make a donation towards a free future for these beautiful creatures. Recommend on Facebook Tweet about...

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The Magic of the African Night

»Posted on Mar 1, 2011 in Blog, Bongo News | 0 comments

The Magic of the African Night

One night late last year high on the Mountain above us, secret romance did its magic. Prince William proposed to his long time love Kate Middleton and she gracefully accepted to become his future Queen of England. That same night a baby bongo was born, (almost within earshot of the lone lovers, we like to think). We named the beautiful little antelope ‘Miss Kate’ in honor of the future queen of England. ‘Miss Kate’ will remain here in the safety of the Mount Kenya Wildlife Conservancy until she reaches breeding age and her own suitable “Prince” can be selected. It is hoped that together they will one day roam free and raise their own young in the wilderness of the Mount Kenya Forests where their ancestors once roamed. Please...

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Bongo Release News Flash

»Posted on Aug 26, 2010 in Blog, Bongo News | 0 comments

Bongo Release News Flash

Our first release of 10 Bongo that had been planned and worked on for the last two years has once again been postponed. Two days before the actual release, with all preparations, staff and equipment “at the ready” the Kenya Wildlife Service advised us that they wished to postpone the first release until they could clarify some technical issues. The KWS had received correspondence from a Dr. Jake Veasey (Woburn Abbey Safari Park, U.K.) and others, speculating that any release of captive bred bongo could somehow jeopardize the genetics of any bongo remaining in the wild. This was based on the assumption that a very small number of bongo (estimated at max 15) may have survived in the vast and dense forests on Mount Kenya. The KWS called for another...

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Goodbye Jolly Good Fellow

»Posted on Nov 23, 2009 in Blog, Bongo News | 1 comment

Goodbye Jolly Good Fellow

“He who has done his best for his own time has lived for all times” – fitting words of wisdom by famous poet Schiller for the Bongo Boy who quietly left us this summer but will forever remain very special to us. Noah – once bright chestnut colored, his coat darkened with age. Almost black at the end, Noah’s presence, like that of his famous namesake, was synonymous with continued life. At the age of 3 he presented us with his firstborn, Karen, and over the years several brothers and sisters followed. Interestingly, in his prime, Noah seemed to have had a knack to add girls to his brood. In later years, the boys followed. His offspring made him the proud grandfather of 14 adorable Bongos, every single one adopted by well-wishers from...

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The BBC captures our Bongo

»Posted on Mar 24, 2009 in Blog, Bongo News | 0 comments

The BBC captures our Bongo

January 2004 in retrospect: The BBC amongst other reputed television networks reports the return of 20 of Africa’s rarest and most elusive antelope, the Mountain Bongo, to Mount Kenya Wildlife Conservancy. 5 years on – January 2009: In anticipation of a first wilderness release later this year, a BBC film crew has returned to Mount Kenya Wildlife Conservancy to film Mountain Bongo for a 3-part natural history series about Kenya. As the film rolls, we follow the crew around with our own camera and bear witness to a very special reunion. It’s 6.30 in the morning. Whilst guests at the adjacent Mount Kenya Safari Club are still sleeping, our Wildlife Officer Fundi is directing a dark green Land Cruiser across the Conservancy, many pairs of eyes on us....

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Change Indeed…

»Posted on Jan 15, 2009 in Blog, Bongo News | 0 comments

Change Indeed…

A great New Years gift awaited us on January first: Bongo mother ‘Baraka’ gave birth to a healthy female calf during the night. Mother Baraka (Kiswahili for BLESSING) was one of the first group of bongo calves born to the ‘native American’ mothers that were returned to Kenya. Four days into 2009 another little ‘girl ‘ bongo joined her. Her mother carries the proud name “Miss Kenya,” first born on Kenyan soil of American Heritage!! All of us here take great pride in naming the two new bongo after two other delightful young girls of true Kenyan heritage that have made world news lately: Malia and Sasha, the charming young daughters of President Barack Obama. Photos by long time Conservancy supporter Jane McKeand who...

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A Bongo Kaleidoscope – as observed by Lilli

»Posted on Jun 6, 2008 in Blog, Bongo News | 0 comments

A Bongo Kaleidoscope – as observed by Lilli

10 May 2008 – Ajabu’s big day. In the lush surroundings of her beautiful forest home at Mount Kenya Wildlife Conservancy, she has chosen this day for the arrival of her firstborn. Nature sees to it that, instinctively, mother and young will always find each other but how do we, their human caretakers, tell them apart, you might ask? Is it their horns – beautifully long or sometimes not yet visible? Does their coat set them apart – a whole palette of an enthusiastic painter? Do the stripes give them away? Well, it is a combination of these features that give every one of our protégées their unique identity. Our Wildlife Officer Fundi has opened the family album for you promising to make you a Bongo expert. STRIPES Bongo have between 8 to 14 vertical white...

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Mount Kenya Wildlife Conservancy